Tip #814: 7 Design Principles for Experiential Learning

On March 16, 2020, Posted by , In curriculum design, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #814: 7 Design Principles for Experiential Learning

“Give the pupils something to do, not something to learn; and the doing is of such a nature as to demand thinking; learning naturally results.

 We do not learn from experience…we learn from reflecting on experience.”  John Dewey

There are 7 design principles for experiential learning, according to Megan Underwood, who is the VP Canada and Manager of Learning Design at Practera. She begins by defining experiential learning as learning by doing or learning by having an experience. She then delineates her 7 principles:

Principle #1: Design Backwards. Determine what we want the participants to be able to demonstrate or accomplish by the end of the training. Then decide how to get them to demonstrate that they can do that. … Read the rest

Tip #693:  Why Did It Happen?

On October 17, 2017, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #693:  Why Did It Happen?

“Without reflection, we go blindly on our way, creating more unintended consequences, and failing to achieve anything useful.”  Margaret J. Wheatley

In participative learning, it is important that each learning activity be debriefed to give the participants an opportunity to reflect on their experience and reinforce their learning.

It is just as important to have those involved in a critical work situation take time to assess whether the actions taken were effective and, if not, what should be done differently in the future.

I’ve always thought that it made sense to debrief a learning activity or management situation by asking these three questions:

  1. What went well?
  2. What didn’t go well, and why not?
  3. What did you learn?

Recently, I read … Read the rest

Tip #640: True Learning Requires Reflection

On September 6, 2016, Posted by , In learning, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #640: True Learning Requires Reflection

“We do not learn from experience… we learn from reflecting on experience.” John Dewey

It has always been an important closing activity for my skill-building workshops to have the participants identify their key learning or their key take away.

When an action plan is appropriate, I have the participants identify their key challenges and what they will do to address these challenges, in addition to their significant learning.

If I close with a paired walk-about activity, the participants are asked to pair up and explain how they plan to use what they have learned.

An article by Katrina Schwartz titled: “Don’t Leave Learning Up to Chance: Framing and Reflection” helped me realize that these closing activities are important because they … Read the rest

Tip #597: Making the Best Mistakes- Part One

On November 30, 2015, Posted by , In learning, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #597: Making the Best Mistakes- Part One

Learning from mistakes is not automatic. In order to learn from them we need to reflect on our errors and extract lessons from them.” Eduardo Briceno

We know that “to err is human” and the best thing we can do is to accept that we will make mistakes and learn from them. However, according to Eduardo Briceno, the CEO of Mindset Works, there are four types of mistakes that are most useful in the learning process.

These four mistakes are: stretch mistakes, aha-moment mistakes, sloppy mistakes and high-stakes mistakes.

This Tip and the next three Tips will focus on each of these types of mistakes. We’ll begin by looking at stretch mistakes, as described by Mr. Briceno:

“Stretch mistakesRead the rest

Tip #348: Avoid Mistakes When Timing Learning Activities, Part One

On November 8, 2010, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #348: Avoid Mistakes When Timing Learning Activities, Part One

“If you have made a mistake, cut your losses as quickly as possible.” Bernard Baruch

There are ten mistakes that trainers frequently make when they plan and schedule time for learning activities. We will consider the first five mistakes in this Tip and cover the remaining five mistakes in next week’s Tip.

Mistake #1: Not Telling Participants How Much Time They Have

The best way to keep an activity on schedule is to tell the participants how much time they will have to complete it. Then project a countdown clock on the screen, so they can track their own progress. [Basic countdown clocks are available for free on the Internet]. Since the time you give them is simply an … Read the rest