Laurel and Associates, Ltd. – Madison, WI

Tip #819: New Words and Acronyms

Home  >>  communication  >>  Tip #819: New Words and Acronyms

Tip #819: New Words and Acronyms

On April 20, 2020, Posted by , In communication, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #819: New Words and Acronyms

“No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.” John Keating

I thought that some of these words and acronyms might resonate with you at this time.

Allostasis: an adjusted or changed stress load.

AMLAP: As Many (feedback and reflection) Loops As Possible

Assignmentology: the thoughtful placement of people in assignments for the purpose of meeting the developmental needs of the individual and/or the business needs of the organization.

Equifinality: a result can be achieved in many different ways.

HCM: Human Capital Management

HITT: High Intensity Thought Training

Ikigai: a Japanese concept meaning “a reason for being” that looks at the intersection between what you love, what you’re good at, what you can be paid for and what the world needs.

Interoception: a sense that helps you understand and feel what’s going on inside your body.

Kakeibo: A Japanese budgeting method, which requires you to write down purchases and ask yourself whether you need or will even use an item.

LTSI: Learning Transfer System Inventory

LXD:  Learning Experience Design

Phonesthetics:  the study of beauty and pleasantness associated with the sounds of certain words or parts of words.

Proactive interference: a process of deliberately discarding obsolete, unhelpful or redundant information.

Psycho-terratic: a new category of diseases related to eco-anxiety, global dread, etc.

Sostalgia: the feeling of distress or melancholy caused by environmental change.

TBLL: Triple Bottom Line of Learning: the C-suite, the learning team and the learners.

A T-shaped employee: a person with deep expertise in one area as well as broad knowledge and skills.

WYSIATI: What You See Is All There Is: a cognitive bias that restricts your view to what’s right in front of you.

May your learning be sweet- and safe.

Deborah

Share