Laurel and Associates, Ltd. – Madison, WI

Tip #158: Designing Facilitator Guides #2

Tip #158: Designing Facilitator Guides #2

On February 25, 2007, Posted by , In curriculum design, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #158: Designing Facilitator Guides #2

Once we have determined what information the facilitator will need in the facilitator guide, we can answer the seventh question:

7. What format will be most useful for the facilitator?

We have a number of choices regarding the format for the facilitator guide. We will consider three different formats: an annotated table of contents, an annotated lesson plan, and a scripted facilitator guide.

One of the simplest facilitator “guides”is an Annotated Table of Contents

If the facilitator is well versed in the content and has been actively involved in the design of the training, the format can be quite simple. The facilitator just needs something easy to scan that will help with pacing and planning.

The key information that the facilitator will need is:

  • the key content points (in many cases, these are the section titles or agenda items)
  • the duration of the focus on this key content
  • the type of learning activities
  • when they occur
  • how long they should last
  • how to introduce, facilitate and debrief the activities
  • the specific handout pages and/or PowerPoint slides to which the activities relate
  • when to introduce necessary job aids
  • break times and durations

I have found that it actually works to annotate the Table of Contents for the program, adding in all of this information.

Please note that in the following example of an annotated Table of Contents, the documents in bold print indicate the section titles or agenda items and the documents in italicized print indicate participant activities. Also, for purposes of pacing and planning ahead, the total number of PowerPoint slides used in each section is also identified. In order to assist the facilitator with pacing, a PowerPoint slide of the section title is used at the beginning of each section. Click here to view and/or download an example of an annotated Table of Contents.

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