Tip #617: If At First You Don’t Succeed, There’s Probably a Good Reason

On April 18, 2016, Posted by , In trainers, By ,,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #617: If At First You Don’t Succeed, There’s Probably a Good Reason

“Success depends upon previous preparation, and without such preparation there is sure to be failure.” Confucius

The first time I tried to make yeast bread (using a written version of an oral recipe from my grandmother), I waited three days for the yeast to bubble. It had actually bubbled within the first few minutes, but I missed it. Feeling frustrated and foolish, I never tried to make her yeast bread again.

What brought this to mind was a meeting to discuss the effectiveness of a newly created participant-centered curriculum. The subject matter experts (SMEs) responsible for delivering the curriculum had essentially ignored it and presented their lecture-based curriculum instead.

Why? There were a number of reasons:

  1. They did not
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Tip #501: In Praise of Piloting Training Programs

On January 20, 2014, Posted by , In presentation, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #501: In Praise of Piloting Training Programs

“The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance- it is the illusion of knowledge.” Daniel J. Boorstin

I rarely get an opportunity to pilot training that I have designed. My clients generally only want a program given once or maybe twice, without any trial run.

The only way to get pre-training feedback is either to send a detailed lesson plan to the client for review and comment (when I have expertise in the content)- or to send it to a subject matter expert for review and comment (when I have relied on that individual for the content).

However, these options fall far short in determining how relevant and effective the content, format and learning activities will be.

This point was … Read the rest