Tip #730: MUCH Better Evaluation Questions

On July 16, 2018, Posted by , In learning, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #730: MUCH Better Evaluation Questions

“Information useful to training professionals typically relates to Levels 1 and 2. You want to ensure that the training resulted in learning, and ultimately, that participants are ready to perform on the job. “ James D. Kirkpatrick

For years I have asked the same questions for participants to rate Kirkpatrick’s Level One- Reaction:

Personal Significance of Workshop

  1. Of the ideas, concepts and/ or techniques covered, which do you consider to be of the most use to you?
  2. List one or two ways in which you can apply something learned during this training experience to your current situation.

Quality of Presentation

  1. Please comment on the method of facilitation (i.e. use of audio visuals; mix of lecture, group and individual work; sufficiency
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Tip #582: The Power of Multiples of Five in Training

“A rule to live by: I won’t use anything I can’t explain in five minutes.” Philip Crosby

The number five, or multiples of five, occurs frequently in training. It applies to curriculum design, room set up, training delivery and group facilitation.

  1. Accelerated learning promotes participant-centered “whole body learning” by engaging as many of the 5 traditionally recognized senses as possible. Audiovisuals and peripherals on the walls will engage the sense of sight. Experiential learning activities will engage the senses of hearing and touch. Bowls of candy on the training tables will engage the sense of taste. Fragrant magic markers will engage the sense of smell.
  1. Five is the ideal number of participants to be seated at a training table.
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Tip #515: What Do We Really Want Our Audience to Tell Us?

On April 28, 2014, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #515: What Do We Really Want Our Audience to Tell Us?

“Feedback is the breakfast of champions”.  Kenneth Blanchard

When we finish giving a presentation or conducting a training program, what do we really want our audience or training participants to tell us- and when would we like that feedback?

There are a variety of written evaluation strategies in use.

Some trainers use evaluation sheets with a Likert scale (for example, rating 1-5) so the audience can provide a numerical rating. The belief is that it is faster for participants to select a rating than to write a comment- and there is certainly some truth to that.

The questions may fall into general categories that pertain to the content, the format and the presenter. The questions may relate to each of … Read the rest

Tip #504: When Good Intentions Make Life So Much Harder

On February 10, 2014, Posted by , In learning activities, By , With Comments Off on Tip #504: When Good Intentions Make Life So Much Harder

“The more elaborate our means of communication, the less we communicate.”  Joseph Priestley

I work with different managers and subject matter experts to design the content and activities for their sections in a two-day new employee orientation training program. I then emcee the program.

This time, since there were a number of new presenters and/or new content, it occurred to me that the session evaluations should be designed to give each presenter feedback.

So, I designed an evaluation form for each day in a table format that gave the section title and presenter’s name on the left and asked for ratings for facilitator, content and activity on the right. The rating scale was 1-5, with 5 the highest rating.

There … Read the rest

Tip #436: A Guaranteed Way to Get All Participant Evaluations

On September 24, 2012, Posted by , In learning activities, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #436: A Guaranteed Way to Get All Participant Evaluations

“The excellence of a gift lies in its appropriateness rather than its value. Charles Dudley Warner

Trainers often bemoan the fact that it is difficult to get participants to complete and return their session evaluations. This is also true for any business event where participant feedback is desired.

I have discovered a sure fire way to get all participants to hand in their completed evaluations. The secret involves a simple five-step process;

Step 1: Alert the participants that they will receive a nice gift in return for handing in their evaluations at the end of the session.

Step 2: Put a picture of the gift on the PowerPoint slide that instructs the participants to complete the evaluation.

Step 3: … Read the rest

Tip #403: Six Reasons For Trainers to Ignore Participant Evaluations

On December 5, 2011, Posted by , In trainers, By ,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #403: Six Reasons For Trainers to Ignore Participant Evaluations

“I like criticism, but it must be my way.”  Mark Twain

Criticism can be uncomfortable, unkind, and unfounded. As a result, unless they want to be the next Top Model or American Idol, most people avoid situations in which they are likely to be criticized.

Assuming that trainers are not masochists, there are many reasons why they may dislike and want to avoid having participants evaluate their training programs. After all, hours of work go into creating training program materials. Conducting a training program can be exhausting. Why add insult to injury by requesting participant feedback?

Unfortunately, participants are customarily asked to evaluate the training programs that they attend. Since trainers cannot avoid these program evaluations, they need some other … Read the rest