Tip #777:  Incorporate physical movement into the training program.

On June 17, 2019, Posted by , In learning activities, By , With Comments Off on Tip #777:  Incorporate physical movement into the training program.

“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.”  Goethe

In his excellent book: The Accelerated Learning Handbook, Dave Meier advises: “Make sure to get people out of their seats and provide opportunities for physical movement and activity as part of the learning process.“ Physical movement has been shown to have a positive impact on learning and retention.

Neurological research indicates that thinking and bodily movement are interconnected in the brain. In fact, the part of the neocortex that governs thinking and problem solving is situated next to the part of the neocortex that controls fine motor functions. Bodily movement also stimulates the secretion of chemicals that are essential for neural network construction in the … Read the rest

Tip #169: Interactive versus Experiential Learning, Part Two

On May 2, 2007, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #169: Interactive versus Experiential Learning, Part Two

There are approximately ten broad categories of interactive or experiential learning strategies. The first five categories are identified below, along with some specific examples. Please note that these categories often overlap. Scavenger hunt is actually listed under physical movement and reading, to emphasize this point. Many activities involve reading, writing, and discussion. A relay race is a game that also involves physical movement, writing, problem solving, and discussion, etc.

1. Art: Any creative design activity intended to embody training concepts in a visual or tactile manner.

  • Draw a picture of themselves as either a food, a vehicle, or a pet- and label their characteristics.
  • Use art supplies to create an image of the training essence or metaphor (bridge, fruit tree,
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Tip #12: Incorporate physical movement into the training program.

On April 1, 2004, Posted by , In brain research, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #12: Incorporate physical movement into the training program.

In his excellent book: The Accelerated Learning Handbook, Dave Meier advises: “Make sure to get people out of their seats and provide opportunities for physical movement and activity as part of the learning process.” Physical movement has been shown to have a positive impact on learning and retention.

Neurological research indicates that thinking and bodily movement are interconnected in the brain. In fact, the part of the neocortex that governs thinking and problem solving is situated next to the part of the neocortex that controls fine motor functions. Bodily movement also stimulates the secretion of chemicals that are essential for neural network construction in the brain, which aids learning. Together, the mind and the body are one completely integrated … Read the rest