Tip #774:   Make training decisions with the learner in mind.

On May 27, 2019, Posted by , In trainers, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #774:   Make training decisions with the learner in mind.

Good training is never static. Instead, it is “a constant stream of professional decisions made before, during and after interaction with the learner; decisions which, when implemented, increase the probability of learning.” *

As trainers, we should do our best to stay in touch with the learning needs of our participants. This responsibility does not stop after we have conducted a training needs assessment and designed the lesson plan and materials. We have to be prepared to make additional decisions during the training in order to meet their needs.

Regardless of who or what is being taught, all training decisions fall into three categories:  1. Content [what content to teach next]; 2. Learner Activities [what the … Read the rest

Tip #565: The Power of Six in Training

“If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend six sharpening my ax.” Abraham Lincoln

According to the Mastery Teaching Model designed by Dr. Madeline Hunter of UCLA, trainers make three decisions: (1) what content will be taught, (2) what the learners will do to learn and demonstrate their learning, and (3) what the trainer will do to create a positive and motivational learning environment.

The number six occurs during each of these decisions.

Within the content decision:

  • There are six basic steps in the design of a lesson plan for a training program:

(1) conduct a needs assessment to determine if training is needed and, if so, what needs to be covered and who needs to … Read the rest

Tip #227: Debunking Myths About More Practice

On June 25, 2008, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #227: Debunking Myths About More Practice

According to Dr. David A Sousa, “the old adage that ‘practice makes perfect’ is rarely true. It is very possible to practice the same skill repeatedly with no increase in achievement or accuracy of application.”

Dr. Sousa notes in his book How the Brain Learns that “practice refers to learners repeating a skill over time… The quality of the practice and the learner’s knowledge base will largely determine the outcome of each practice session.”

In her book, Mastery Teaching, Dr. Madeline Hunter identifies four conditions that must be met for practice to improve performance:

  1. The learner must be sufficiently motivated to want to improve performance.
  2. The learner must have all the knowledge necessary to understand the different ways that
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Tip #142: Accelerated Learning in Croatia #3

Accelerated learning techniques include involving as many senses as possible for whole brain learning and to meet the needs of different learning styles. Color, music, touch, movement, visual stimulation, and the use of metaphor and story are all very important ingredients in an accelerated learning classroom.

After my first trip to Croatia to train trainers for the small business development centers in 1998, I returned four more times in March and July of 2000 and March and May of 2001 to work with the School of Economics at JJ Strossmeyer University in Osijek.. My assignment was to help them design the first European student-centered MBA program in Entrepreneurship and train the faculty there. My son Seth accompanied me on the … Read the rest

Tip #131: MTM: Effective Examples

On July 7, 2006, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #131: MTM: Effective Examples

Trainer behavior is concerned with what the trainer will do to facilitate learning. The use of relevant examples can ensure that learning occurs more quickly and is retained longer, because the example already has meaning to the learner.

Last week, we looked at four criteria involved in creating effective examples. Dr. Hunter also has suggestions for how to present those examples:

  1. Highlight critical attributes by offering obvious –non exemplars.” Half of knowing what something is, is knowing what it isn’t. A “non exemplar” is an example that is similar but lacks the critical attribute or essence of the example being taught.

    Analyze each example in advance. It is difficult to come up with an excellent example off the cuff. The

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Tip #130: MTM: Trainer Behavior Decisions

On June 28, 2006, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #130: MTM: Trainer Behavior Decisions

Trainer behavior is concerned with what the trainer will do to facilitate learning. The use of relevant examples can ensure that learning occurs more quickly and is retained longer, because the example already has meaning to the learner.

According to Dr. Madeline Hunter, “If the examples have certain critical characteristics, positive transfer will more predictably occur and learning will be accelerated.” To produce effective examples:

1. Identify the “essence” of what is to be learned. This essence or critical attribute is that which makes something what it is; no other thing has that particular attribute or set of attributes. Examples of critical attributes:

  • Mammals possess mammary glands and hair.
  • A pledge is a verbal statement (written or oral) made to
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