Tip #715:  What Myths Are You Perpetuating?

On April 2, 2018, Posted by , In learning, By ,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #715:  What Myths Are You Perpetuating?

“I have always found fact infinitely more interesting than myths and falsehoods.” John Brunner

I just read a fascinating article titled: 12 Educational Research Myths,  by John Dabell. He calls them “12 of the best ‘worst’ research myths and legends.”

There are six that jumped out at me, four of which I didn’t realize were myths:

  1. Edgar Dale’s Cone of Experience was debunked quite a while ago. Unfortunately, some trainers still teach that people remember 10% of what they read, 20% of what they hear, 30% of what they see, 50% of what they see and hear, 70% of what they say and write, and 90% of what they do. [I knew this one]

According to Will Thalheimer (2015): … Read the rest

Tip #565: The Power of Six in Training

“If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend six sharpening my ax.” Abraham Lincoln

According to the Mastery Teaching Model designed by Dr. Madeline Hunter of UCLA, trainers make three decisions: (1) what content will be taught, (2) what the learners will do to learn and demonstrate their learning, and (3) what the trainer will do to create a positive and motivational learning environment.

The number six occurs during each of these decisions.

Within the content decision:

  • There are six basic steps in the design of a lesson plan for a training program:

(1) conduct a needs assessment to determine if training is needed and, if so, what needs to be covered and who needs to … Read the rest

Tip #518: Lesson Design Distilled Down to Four Key Questions

On May 19, 2014, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #518: Lesson Design Distilled Down to Four Key Questions

“Concentrating on the essentials. We will then be accomplishing the greatest possible results with the effort expended. ” Ted W. Engstrom

There are four lesson design questions that can help a trainer design an engaging and effective learning program:

(1) What specific, observable, and measurable results are desired?

(2) What level of learning will be required?

(3) What key content needs to be learned to achieve the desired results? and

(4) What learning activities will achieve the desired learning results, attain the desired level of learning, and meet different learning style needs?

These questions are intended to focus the training designer and the resultant training on what the learners need to accomplish the desired learning. They are discussed below.

1.  Read the rest

Tip #506: Learning Styles May Be a Myth, But Learning Preferences Do Exist

On February 24, 2014, Posted by , In learning, By ,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #506: Learning Styles May Be a Myth, But Learning Preferences Do Exist

“There’s a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure truth.” Maya Angelou

A lot of research has been done to discover if there is any truth to the idea that there are actually “learning styles.” The studies have found that there is no scientific basis for learning styles. Instead, they found that people were able to effectively learn using either visual, auditory and/or kinesthetic sensory modalities.

It may be a fact that there is no a scientific basis for learning styles, but any trainer can tell you in truth that there are certainly learning preferences. If you ask a group of participants how they learn best, you will get a wide range of answers that fall … Read the rest

Tip #383: What is Magic About the Number Three in Curriculum Design?

On July 18, 2011, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #383: What is Magic About the Number Three in Curriculum Design?

“No one can remember more than three points.” Philip Crosby

It may seem surprising, but the number three plays a significant role in curriculum design in both theory and practice. Following the principles outlined in the eight triads below will significantly improve the likelihood that the training you design will effectively achieve the desired learning results.

a. Needs Assessment

Curriculum design begins with finding the answers to three key questions that will help determine whether training is the right solution to the identified problem:

1. Who is the target audience?

2. Why is there a need for this specific training?

3. What should the learners know or do differently when they leave the training?

Answers to these key curriculum design … Read the rest

Tip #211: A Kinesthetic Learner

On March 20, 2008, Posted by , In learning, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #211: A Kinesthetic Learner

We’ve focused the past two Tips on kinesthetic objects. Three days ago, I had a wonderful experience with a kinesthetic learner.

I was auditing a Lighting Fixture Maintenance workshop for Southern California Edison to assess whether effective learning was occurring. This workshop was advertised as a hands on program. Before the workshop began, one participant (I’ll call him John) asked about other hands on workshops offered by Southern California Edison. I really didn’t think anything of the question. I just assumed that he was interested in very practical workshops on how to install, maintain, or fix energy-related items and appliances.

Then the class began. The room was set in classroom style and the tables were bare of any kinesthetic objects.… Read the rest