Tip #564: The Power of Two in Training

On April 13, 2015, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #564: The Power of Two in Training

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I’m not sure about the former.” Albert Einstein

It is interesting how often the number two recurs in participatory training design, facilitation and evaluation.

In the design phase:

  • There are two basic types of lesson plan formats: (1) the outline format and (2) the table format.

Although they are laid out differently, they have the same components: program title, learning goals, learning objectives, total length of the program, learning activities to achieve each learning objective (organized in learning modules that ultimately comprise the agenda), the duration of each module, handout materials, audiovisual aids and equipment needed, and a means to evaluate if learning has successfully occurred.

  • There should
Read the rest

Tip #518: Lesson Design Distilled Down to Four Key Questions

On May 19, 2014, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #518: Lesson Design Distilled Down to Four Key Questions

“Concentrating on the essentials. We will then be accomplishing the greatest possible results with the effort expended. ” Ted W. Engstrom

There are four lesson design questions that can help a trainer design an engaging and effective learning program:

(1) What specific, observable, and measurable results are desired?

(2) What level of learning will be required?

(3) What key content needs to be learned to achieve the desired results? and

(4) What learning activities will achieve the desired learning results, attain the desired level of learning, and meet different learning style needs?

These questions are intended to focus the training designer and the resultant training on what the learners need to accomplish the desired learning. They are discussed below.

1.  Read the rest

Tip #366: How to Manage Time Limitations for Lots of Training Content

On March 14, 2011, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #366: How to Manage Time Limitations for Lots of Training Content

“We are all faced with a series of great opportunities brilliantly disguised as impossible situations.” Charles Swindoll

Companies are doing more with less, so their employees have limited time to spend in training sessions. As a result, many trainers are frequently charged with what appears to be an impossible expectation: deliver training in a fraction of the time necessary and usually allotted for it.

The bad news is that trainers may react to imposed time limitations in two ways that produce ineffective learning results.

First, trainers eliminate learning activities in order to have more time to lecture on content. There are at least two problems with this response:

(a) Learning activities are designed to help learners achieve desired levels of … Read the rest

Tip #362: How to Build Learners’ Confidence in Their Own Competence

On February 14, 2011, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #362: How to Build Learners’ Confidence in Their Own Competence

“One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.” Arthur Ashe

If learners lack confidence in their mastery of new learning when they leave the classroom, they are much less likely to apply this new learning back at their work site. As a result, the prime mission of every trainer should be to build the learners’ confidence in their own competence.

There are three closely related approaches that a trainer can take to accomplish this. Together, all three approaches will ensure that the learners have the preparation they need.

First, plan for the learners to demonstrate their learning in the classroom. When designing the curriculum, the learning objectives should identify what the learners will do … Read the rest

Tip #260: Learning versus Training

For a long time now, I have emphasized this key message in each and every train the trainer workshop: the training program is about the learner, not the trainer. And each time, as I’ve shown participants how to develop learning objectives, I’ve had to continually remind them that learning objectives identify what the learner will do during the session, not what the trainer will do.

Well, I’ve finally figured out what I’ve been doing wrong- and it has to do with a disconnect between my message and my semantics.

For example, I originally created and taught the following six-step LESSON planning process:

1. L OOK into the TRAINING NEEDS.

2. E STABLISH the TRAINING GOALS.

3. S ELECT the … Read the rest

Tip #218: Training Methods vs. Learning Activities

On May 10, 2008, Posted by , In learning, By ,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #218: Training Methods vs. Learning Activities

A participant in a recent training session objected to the term “training.”He felt that training is something we do to others, while learning is something that learners do for themselves.

Since I am an English major, I went directly to the dictionary to check out the definitions. “Train”is defined as “to instruct so as to make proficient.””Instruct”is defined as “to teach or educate.””Teach”is defined as “to provide with knowledge or insight.””Educate”is defined as “to develop the knowledge, skill, or character of, especially by formal schooling.”Training can, therefore, be further defined as providing a learner with knowledge or insight.

“Learning,”on the other hand, is defined as “the acquisition of knowledge or skill.””Acquire”is defined as “to gain by one’s own … Read the rest