Tip #775:  Clarify the desired levels of learning.

On June 3, 2019, Posted by , In learning, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #775:  Clarify the desired levels of learning.

“To learn and not to do is really not to learn. To know and not to do is really not to know.” Stephen R. Covey

It is essential to clearly identify the desired level of learning we want the participants to attain. This means that we need to decide whether our aim during the course of the workshop is for the participants to: know the information, but not understand it [KNOWLEDGE]; know and understand it [COMPREHENSION]; or know, understand,  and use it [APPLICATION]. These are the first three of six progressive building blocks of learning (otherwise known as Bloom’s Taxonomy of Behavioral Objectives).

It is unlikely that a trainer will ever intentionally aim only for the lowest rung, or … Read the rest

Tip #629: How Knowledge and Confidence Can Curb Learning

On July 11, 2016, Posted by , In brain research, By ,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #629: How Knowledge and Confidence Can Curb Learning

“Fortunately for serious minds, a bias recognized is a bias sterilized.” Benjamin Haydon

There is a lot that can interfere with a willingness to learn new things.

Andrea May, VP of Instructional Design Services for Dashe & Thomson, has identified what she considers to be the top ten cognitive biases that adversely affect learning and posted those on the Dashe & Thomson Social Learning Blog.

Let’s look at the next two cognitive biases and discuss how we can counter their effect through our training design and delivery. The titles and descriptions of the biases are Ms. May’s. The commentary is mine.

3.  Dunning-Kruger effect: The tendency for incompetent people to overestimate their competence, and very competent people to underestimate their Read the rest

Tip #585: Which is More Important for New Hires, Knowledge or Attitude?

On September 7, 2015, Posted by , In management and leadership, By ,,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #585: Which is More Important for New Hires, Knowledge or Attitude?

“Ability is what you’re capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.” Lou Holtz

I recently read an article about why it is important for training to be designed to focus on attitude, then skill development, and only then on knowledge. This would certainly be a departure from common wisdom in training. However, it is worth considering both from a training perspective and from a human resource perspective when screening job applicants.

Knowledge and skills are concrete and can be measured. Years ago, when I was a human resources professional writing job descriptions and designing screening examinations for job applicants, it was important to identify the job duties and the knowledge and skill … Read the rest

Tip #102: Learning Levels

On February 1, 2006, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #102: Learning Levels

The fourth step in the comprehensive nine step LESSON PLANning Process is:

STEP 4. SET THE DESIRED LEVELS OF LEARNING.

This step is based on Bloom’s Taxonomy of Behavioral Objectives- or, as we have referred to it, the Building Blocks of Learning (See Tip #8).

It is essential to clearly identify the desired level of learning we want the participants to attain. This means that we need to decide whether our aim during the course of the workshop is for the participants to: know the information, but not understand it [KNOWLEDGE]; know and understand it [COMPREHENSION]; or know, understand, and use it [APPLICATION]. These are the first three of six progressive building blocks of learning (otherwise known as Bloom’s Read the rest