Tip #368: How to Make a Boring Topic Interesting

On March 28, 2011, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #368: How to Make a Boring Topic Interesting

“Never fail to know that if you are doing all the talking, you are boring somebody.”
Helen Gurley Brown

“Any subject can be made interesting, and therefore any subject can be made boring.”
Hilaire Belloc

There are no boring topics, there are only boring training methods. Topics that are highly technical and very dry are typically considered boring. However, the topic is really not the problem. The problem is the training method, which is almost always a lecture. There are many ways to enliven a highly technical or dry topic:

1. Approach the topic from a different perspective.

Instead of citing rules and regulations, put the participants in the role of individuals who need to work within or apply those … Read the rest

Tip #364: How to Facilitate Learning Activities

On February 28, 2011, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,,,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #364: How to Facilitate Learning Activities

“Knowledge is of no value unless you put it into practice.” Herber J. Grant

In response to last week’s Tip on How to Close a Training Session on a High Note, Tom Jackson, Training Team Lead, Division of Strategic National Stockpile, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, offered this great closing activity.

I thought I’d share a closing activity that one of my old employees showed me and I’ve used quite effectively. I am always amazed at how much energy it creates for my wrap up. It may not work too well with large audiences, but for 10 – 50 folks, it seems to do just fine.

Here’s a wrap up activity … Read the rest

Tip #130: MTM: Trainer Behavior Decisions

On June 28, 2006, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #130: MTM: Trainer Behavior Decisions

Trainer behavior is concerned with what the trainer will do to facilitate learning. The use of relevant examples can ensure that learning occurs more quickly and is retained longer, because the example already has meaning to the learner.

According to Dr. Madeline Hunter, “If the examples have certain critical characteristics, positive transfer will more predictably occur and learning will be accelerated.” To produce effective examples:

1. Identify the “essence” of what is to be learned. This essence or critical attribute is that which makes something what it is; no other thing has that particular attribute or set of attributes. Examples of critical attributes:

  • Mammals possess mammary glands and hair.
  • A pledge is a verbal statement (written or oral) made to
Read the rest