Tip #25: Create a motivational environment: Feeling

On June 11, 2004, Posted by , In presentation, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #25: Create a motivational environment: Feeling

The last motivational training technique that helps to convert extrinsic motivation into intrinsic motivation is feeling. If a participant has been set up to be successful, is aware of experiencing that success, expects to continue to be successful, is interested in the content, and is drawn to learn it, then the instructor has created a pleasant learning environment, where it feels good to be there!

7. Feeling:

The way a learner feels in a particular situation affects the amount of effort that learner is willing to put forth to achieve learning. Learners are most inclined to put forth effort to learn if they find the learning situation pleasant and if they anticipate they will be successful (a pleasant feeling).

ExampleRead the rest

Tip #24: Create a motivational environment: Concern

On June 2, 2004, Posted by , In presentation, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #24: Create a motivational environment: Concern

The sixth motivational training technique is Concern. The learner may have a clear intent to learn, because of a concern about the consequences of that learning- for example, certification. However, sometimes the learner’s concern can become overwhelming and make learning difficult.

6. Concern:

The learner’s level of concern relates to how much the learner cares about learning. A moderate level of concern is necessary to increase the learner’s effort to learn. The level of concern can be raised or lowered as needed to increase the learning effort.

Example: An instructor raises the learner’s level of concern by mentioning that a certain piece of information is important or will be tested. Level of concern can be lowered by assuring learners … Read the rest

Tip #23: Create a motivational environment: Interest

On May 29, 2004, Posted by , In presentation, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #23: Create a motivational environment: Interest

The fifth motivational training technique is Interest. We tend to want to learn what interests us, so it is up to the instructor to select content, learning exercises, and learning environments that capture the learners’ interest.

5. Interest:

Interest in the learning task has been demonstrated to affect a learner’s intention to learn. The instructor can promote interest in two ways. First, the instructor can use the learners’ interest in themselves. Second, the material can be made more interesting by accentuating the novel or vivid; that which is different or unexpected.

Example: Relate the material to be learned to the learners’ lives. Use learners’ names and examples that refer to the learners’ experiences. Change the instructor’s voice or position … Read the rest

Tip #22: Create a motivational environment: Confidence

On May 23, 2004, Posted by , In presentation, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #22: Create a motivational environment: Confidence

The fourth motivational training technique is Confidence. Once learners have had a successful learning experience and, based on feedback, received validation that they have been successful, they will have increased confidence in their ability to learn.

4. Confidence:

If learners are to succeed, they must believe that when they expend effort- something they completely control- they will experience success. If, however, learners believe that success or failure is the result of ability, task difficulty, or luck- factors over which they have limited control- then there is no point in putting forth a lot of effort.

Example: An instructor can instill confidence in learners by breaking a new task down and teaching each step separately, making sure that each learner … Read the rest

Tip #21: Create a motivational environment: Feedback

On May 23, 2004, Posted by , In presentation, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #21: Create a motivational environment: Feedback

The third motivational training technique is Feedback. There are two ways that learners can determine if they are successful: specific constructive feedback from the instructor or their peers, as well as a personal sense of accomplishment when they are clearly able to apply newly learned skills during in-class simulations or comprehension-checking activities.

3. Feedback:

The amount, specificity and immediacy of the feedback that learners receive directly affects their performance of a newly learned skill or technique. When learners find out they are doing well, what needs to be improved, what to do to improve it, and then feel that there is a reasonable probability that they can improve it- they are motivated to try to accomplish that improvement.

Example: … Read the rest

Tip #20: Create a motivational environment: Success

On May 19, 2004, Posted by , In presentation, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #20: Create a motivational environment: Success

The second motivational training technique is Success. Since we tend to prefer activities in which we are successful, setting learners up for success can be a good way to move them from extrinsic motivation to intrinsic motivation.

2. Success: In order to feel successful, a person must expend effort and have a certain degree of uncertainty about the outcome. Learner success is responsive to two factors which the instructor controls: (1) the level of difficulty of the learning task and (2) the training design and teaching skills which will make the learners’ learning more probable.

Example: Teaching basic information before teaching more complex information, presenting just a few new concepts at a time, providing sufficient practice so that a … Read the rest