Tip #629: How Knowledge and Confidence Can Curb Learning

On July 11, 2016, Posted by , In brain research, By ,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #629: How Knowledge and Confidence Can Curb Learning

“Fortunately for serious minds, a bias recognized is a bias sterilized.” Benjamin Haydon

There is a lot that can interfere with a willingness to learn new things.

Andrea May, VP of Instructional Design Services for Dashe & Thomson, has identified what she considers to be the top ten cognitive biases that adversely affect learning and posted those on the Dashe & Thomson Social Learning Blog.

Let’s look at the next two cognitive biases and discuss how we can counter their effect through our training design and delivery. The titles and descriptions of the biases are Ms. May’s. The commentary is mine.

3.  Dunning-Kruger effect: The tendency for incompetent people to overestimate their competence, and very competent people to underestimate their Read the rest

Tip #565: The Power of Six in Training

“If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend six sharpening my ax.” Abraham Lincoln

According to the Mastery Teaching Model designed by Dr. Madeline Hunter of UCLA, trainers make three decisions: (1) what content will be taught, (2) what the learners will do to learn and demonstrate their learning, and (3) what the trainer will do to create a positive and motivational learning environment.

The number six occurs during each of these decisions.

Within the content decision:

  • There are six basic steps in the design of a lesson plan for a training program:

(1) conduct a needs assessment to determine if training is needed and, if so, what needs to be covered and who needs to … Read the rest

Tip #560: We Avoid What We Are Unsuccessful Doing

On March 16, 2015, Posted by , In learning, By ,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #560: We Avoid What We Are Unsuccessful Doing

“True success is overcoming the fear of being unsuccessful.” Paul Sweeney

When my two little granddaughters visited, I had to work with the second grader on her homework. She really didn’t want to do it.

It was math homework, which was not my best subject at any age, including this one! It was immediately clear that her negative attitude, and resulting desire to get the homework over with as soon as possible, kept her from reading the complete problem or thinking through the solution. Based on the first few words in the directions, she would pull an answer out of thin air and write it down.

Okay, so that was one problem- and that was her responsibility. She had … Read the rest