Tip #710: How to Set Learners Up to Fail: Part Two

On February 27, 2018, Posted by , In presentation,Uncategorized, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #710: How to Set Learners Up to Fail: Part Two

“I’ve been imitated so well I’ve heard people copy my mistakes.” Jimi Hendrix

I just attended a three- day marketing seminar conducted by a self-proclaimed curriculum design expert. It was very disappointing to see once again what happens when a trainer ignores the basics and sets learners up to fail.

She made ten glaring mistakes. We covered the first five in last week’s Tip. Here are mistakes 6-10:

  1. Never hold a one-on-one conversation with a participant in response to a question or comment that many could not hear.

Instead, repeat every question and comment before you answer it. This is both a courtesy and a necessity for those who might have shared the same concern or confusion and needed … Read the rest

Tip #516: What Do You Want Your Audience to Do?

On May 5, 2014, Posted by , In presentation, By ,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #516: What Do You Want Your Audience to Do?

“Every choice you make has an end result.”  Zig Ziglar

I recently reviewed a number of 20-minute videos of trainers in a global organization. I found three major issues. First, there was a heavy reliance on PowerPoint. Second, there was a huge amount of information. Third, it was unclear what the audience was supposed to do with the information.

Let’s look at the issues, one at a time.

When I say that there was a heavy reliance on PowerPoint, this is what I saw:

1.   The slides were filled with text.

2.   The text was too small to see from the back of the room.

3.   The trainers read the slides to the participants.

4.   The PowerPoint slides comprised the … Read the rest

Tip #165: Checking for Comprehension and Debriefing Exercises

On April 3, 2007, Posted by , In presentation, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #165: Checking for Comprehension and Debriefing Exercises

Checking for Comprehension

  1. Check for comprehension of the content. You can do this by asking questions or encouraging participants to provide some examples.
  2. After giving an assignment, walk around the room to be sure that they understand and are working on the correct assignment.
  3. Check with the participants occasionally- either in the large group, by talking with individuals during the break, or dip-sticking the small groups- to be sure that the pace is comfortable and everyone is on the same page with you.

Debriefing Exercises

  1. It is important to have the individual or group representatives report out after they have completed an exercise. Otherwise, they will not have any sense of closure.
  2. Draw out the correct or more complete answers
Read the rest