Tip #532: A Learning Manifesto

On August 25, 2014, Posted by , In learning, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #532: A Learning Manifesto

“I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times.”   Everett M. Dirksen

I recently saw an article concerning a “serious elearning manifesto,” so I explored further,

Here is a list of the Supporting Principles for the Serious eLearning Manifesto created by Michael Allen, Julie Dirksen, Clark Quinn and Will Thalheimer. For more information, please go to http://elearningmanifesto.org.

See if the Principles sound familiar. More importantly, see if it is time that we had a Serious Learning Manifesto!

1. Do Not Assume that Learning is the Solution
2. Do Not Assume that eLearning is the Answer
3. Tie Learning to Performance Goals
4. Target Improved Performance
5. Provide Realistic … Read the rest

Tip #364: How to Facilitate Learning Activities

On February 28, 2011, Posted by , In learning activities, By ,,,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #364: How to Facilitate Learning Activities

“Knowledge is of no value unless you put it into practice.” Herber J. Grant

In response to last week’s Tip on How to Close a Training Session on a High Note, Tom Jackson, Training Team Lead, Division of Strategic National Stockpile, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, offered this great closing activity.

I thought I’d share a closing activity that one of my old employees showed me and I’ve used quite effectively. I am always amazed at how much energy it creates for my wrap up. It may not work too well with large audiences, but for 10 – 50 folks, it seems to do just fine.

Here’s a wrap up activity … Read the rest

Tip #281: Improving Energy Education

On July 12, 2009, Posted by , In curriculum design, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #281: Improving Energy Education

Many people may not realize that I have more than 12 years of experience designing specialized energy educational programs and training the trainers who provide energy education on a local, regional and national level. So, before I get on my soapbox, let me offer the credentials that support my opinion on the problems with energy education. In collaboration with technical experts, I designed the curriculum, created the trainer manuals, and trained the trainers for the highly acclaimed National Compressed Air Challenge, the Wisconsin Energy Star Homes Program, and Focus on Energy. These programs include: Compressed Air Challenge Fundamentals and Compressed Air Challenge Advanced Training, Ventilation Basics, Drainage Basics, Practical Energy Management, Integrating High Performance, and the eight-day Wisconsin Energy Star … Read the rest

Tip #215: Adult Learning Principles in Action #2

On April 24, 2008, Posted by , In learning, By , With Comments Off on Tip #215: Adult Learning Principles in Action #2

We are concluding our look at five key categories of adult learning principles, ending with the last two categories. The information that is not in bold print provides an example of the principle in action.

4. Set learners up for success.

a. Adults can learn only a specific amount of information at one time.
A maximum of 5 familiar and meaningful concepts and a maximum of 3 unfamiliar concepts are taught at one time.

b. Adults need to learn rules before they learn exceptions to the rules.
Rules are taught first. Exceptions are not introduced until it is clear that the rules are understood.

c. Adults need to know how one part of the training relates to other parts.
Transitional … Read the rest

Tip #214: Adult Learning Principles in Action #1

On April 17, 2008, Posted by , In learning, By , With Comments Off on Tip #214: Adult Learning Principles in Action #1

We are going to look at five key categories of adult learning principles, beginning with the first three. The information that is not in bold print provides an example of the principle in action.

1. Obtain Learner Buy-In.

a. Adults learn because they see the value of the training content to their lives.
There is an initial activity that helps participants see the value of the training

b. Adults learn best when practical application is encouraged.
The usefulness of the learning in the participants’ lives is emphasized and demonstrated.

c. Adults learn best in an informal atmosphere.
The instructor creates a safe and respectful learning environment.

2. Build On What The Learners Know.

a. Adults bring a wealth of experience Read the rest

Tip #213: Principles Supporting the Learning Facilitator Model

On April 3, 2008, Posted by , In learning, By , , With Comments Off on Tip #213: Principles Supporting the Learning Facilitator Model

The Learning Facilitator educational model is derived from adult learning principles that brain studies have proven to increase the likelihood of learning and retention. Contemporary adult learning principles are drawn from the work of Malcolm Knowles, who is considered to be the father of adult learning. His work was a significant factor in reorienting adult educators from “educating people”to “helping them learn.”

Here are four key adult learning principles:

1. Focus on Key Information
Brain studies have revealed that adults can learn approximately 5 new things within a training segment if those things are familiar and meaningful. If the new items to be learned are unfamiliar, adults can learn only 2-3 of them at a time.

The training segment may … Read the rest