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Tip #726:  The Science of Training: Part Three

“Learning experiences are like journeys. The journey starts where the learning is now, and ends when the learner is successful. The end of the journey isn’t knowing more, it’s doing more.”  Julie Dirksen

Mary Hoddy,  UW Academic Staff Emerita, Facilitator and Consultant, offered this information during a train the trainer program and I thought it was so perfect I should share it with you.

It is a table titled The Science of Training: A Summary. It shows what needs to happen before the training, during the training and after the training. It was published by Global Learning Partners and is a summary of research published by Eduardo Salas, Scott Tennenbaum, Kurt Kraiger and Kimberly Smith-Jentsch: The Science of Training Read the rest

Tip #725:  The Science of Training: Part Two

On June 11, 2018, Posted by , In learning, By , , With No Comments

“Best way to respect learners: Use techniques that research has proven to work. Help people reach their goals without wasting their time.” Cathy Moore

Mary Hoddy,  UW Academic Staff Emerita, Facilitator and Consultant, offered this information during a train the trainer program and I thought it was so perfect I should share it with you.

It is a table titled The Science of Training: A Summary. It shows what needs to happen before the training, during the training and after the training. It was published by Global Learning Partners and is a summary of research published by Eduardo Salas, Scott Tennenbaum, Kurt Kraiger and Kimberly Smith-Jentsch: The Science of Training and Development in Organizations: What Matters in Practice. … Read the rest

Tip #723: The Great Didactic

On May 28, 2018, Posted by , In learning, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #723: The Great Didactic

“I continue to be interested in new things that seem old and old things that seem new.” Jacquelin T. Robertson

We have all probably noticed that, if one waits long enough, what was considered old becomes the shiny new thing. It is certainly true in fashion. It is also apparently true in teaching.

John Amos Comenius published his book, The Great Didactic, in Czech in 1648. According to Wikipedia, he is considered the “father of modern education.” Yet, I for one have never heard of him.

According to  Hannah S. Bowers, John Comenius was a Moravian teacher, educator, bishop, and writer in the seventeenth century.  He is considered the father of modern education because he advocated universal education … Read the rest

Tip #720:  Why Care About DOK™?

On May 7, 2018, Posted by , In learning, By ,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #720:  Why Care About DOK™?

“For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple and wrong.”  H.L. Mencken

DOK™ stands for the Depth of Knowledge framework designed by Dr. Norman Webb. According to Darin Rasmussen, the depth of knowledge “corresponds to the content complexity of a particular educational material.” Dr. Webb has summary definitions for four different subject areas: English Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science. All of the subject areas have four DOK™ levels. See <http://www.webbalign.org/Webbs-DOK-Levels-Summary.pdf>

Mr. Rasmussen explains and summarizes the four DOK™ levels by using the mathematics definitions: see <https://blog.edmentum.com/darinrasmussen>

Level 1:  Recall and Reproduction

This level involves basic tasks that require recall of facts or rote reproduction of simple procedures. The tasks do not require any … Read the rest

Tip #717: When Overlearning Is Important- Part Two

On April 16, 2018, Posted by , In learning, By ,, , With Comments Off on Tip #717: When Overlearning Is Important- Part Two

“Practice is a means of inviting the perfection desired.” Martha Graham

The following Tip is drawn from several sources.

In the previous Tip, we looked at overlearning in life or death situations. In this Tip, we’ll look at other less critical times where overlearning can speed a task, making completion faster and more successful with less effort. Knitting , dancing and playing an instrument come to mind. After sufficient practice, hands, legs and fingers are doing what they need to do without conscious manipulation because they have developed muscle memory.

In whatever field, the process of ‘overlearning’ – or repetitive practice – has far reaching benefits. It can take a person’s performance from good to great by improving Read the rest

Tip #716: When Overlearning Is Important- Part One

On April 9, 2018, Posted by , In learning, By ,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #716: When Overlearning Is Important- Part One

“Over-learning and over-preparing gives you the winning edge in any area.” Brian Tracy

 The following Tip is drawn from several sources.

Overlearning is practicing newly acquired skills beyond the point of initial mastery. The idea is to get to automaticity, which Wikipedia defines as “the ability to do things without occupying the mind with the low-level details required, allowing it to become an automatic response pattern or habit. It is usually the result of learning, repetition and practice.”

I first became aware of the importance of an automatic ingrained response when I was in a lunch line with firefighters at a nearby army base. They needed to know how to immediately assess and respond to a situation where even … Read the rest