Laurel and Associates, Ltd. – Madison, WI

Laurel Learning Tips

Tip #747: Why Care About SCARF?

On November 12, 2018, Posted by , In Uncategorized, With No Comments

“Many great leaders understand intuitively that they need to work hard to create a sense of safety in others. In this way, great leaders are often humble leaders, thereby reducing the status threat. Great leaders provide clear expectations and talk a lot about the future, helping to increase certainty. Great leaders let others take charge and make decisions, increasing autonomy. Great leaders often have a strong presence, which comes from working hard to be authentic and real with other people, to create a sense of relatedness. And great leaders keep their promises, taking care to be perceived as fair.”  David Rock

David Rock is the director of the NeuroLeadership Institute, which uses hard science to transform leadership effectiveness. He is … Read the rest

Tip #746: How to Make Sure It’s the Right Decision

Passion provides purpose, but data drives decisions.” Andy Dunn

I’ve taught classes in problem solving with a focus on finding the real cause or root of the problem, since the obvious problem is rarely the problem. Depending on the nature of the problem, quality improvement tools, such as the is/is not matrix, 6 whys, ishikawa or cause and effect diagram, and top down flow chart, have been very useful. I’ve also taught classes in decision making, with a focus on different ways for groups to vote on different alternatives. I have not taught classes in how to objectively determine the best alternative solutions prior to that final vote.

Now I find that there are numerous ways to analyze options. … Read the rest

Tip #745: Rituals in Training

On October 29, 2018, Posted by , In presentation, By ,,,,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #745: Rituals in Training

There is comfort in rituals, and rituals provide a framework for stability when you are trying to find answers.” Deborah Norville

I recently conducted a two-day class on How to Design Accelerated Learning Programs. It reminded me of the importance of rituals, something that the participants can anticipate will be repeated. And it got me thinking about what constituted a ritual. Here are my thoughts:

  1. At the beginning of a program, I use a Koosh toss to have participants introduce themselves. At the end of every day, I use a Koosh toss to have participants report out their key takeaways.
  2. I repeat a key concept throughout the day by asking the participants to explain it.
  3. Once I’ve taught
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Tip #744: The Power of Counterarguments

On October 22, 2018, Posted by , In communication, By , With Comments Off on Tip #744: The Power of Counterarguments

“In contests of persuasion, counterarguments are typically more powerful than arguments.” Robert Cialdini

According to Cialdini, the superiority of counterarguments “emerges especially when a counterclaim does more than refute a rival’s claim by showing it to be mistaken or misdirected in the particular instance, but does so instead by showing the rival communicator to be an untrustworthy source of information, generally.

Issuing a counterargument demonstrating that an opponent’s argument is not to be believed because its maker is misinformed on the topic will usually succeed on that singular issue. But  a counterargument that undermines an opponent’s argument by showing him or her to be dishonest in the matter will normally win that battle plus future battles with the opponent.”Read the rest

Tip #743: Attention Magnetizers

On October 15, 2018, Posted by , In communication, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #743: Attention Magnetizers

The communicator who can fasten an audience’s focus onto the favorable elements of an argument raises the chance that the argument will go unchallenged by opposing points of view, which get locked out of attention as a consequence.”  Robert Cialdini

According to Cialdini, certain kinds of information combine initial pulling power with staying power. These include what he calls the self-relevant (information about ourselves), the unfinished and the mysterious (both of which magnetize because we need closure).

The Self-Relevant

In considering the self-relevant, he proposes that when recipients get a message that has been tailored specifically for them (by referencing their age, sex or health history) they are more likely to pay attention, find it interesting, take it seriously, … Read the rest

Tip #742: Attention Attractors

On October 8, 2018, Posted by , In communication, By ,,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #742: Attention Attractors

“Certain cues seize our attention vigorously. Those that do so most powerfully are linked to our survival. Sexual and violent stimuli are prime examples because of their connections to our fundamental motivations to reproduce on the one hand and to avoid harm on the other-life and death, literally.” Robert Cialdini

What if you could pre-dispose someone to help you or do what you wanted? Years ago, Robert Cialdini identified six different universal principles of influence: reciprocation, liking, scarcity, authority, social proof, and consistency. And, more recently, a seventh: unity.

However, he has determined that there are preliminary actions you can take to lay the groundwork so that persuasion will be more likely. In his latest book, Pre-Suasion, he identifies … Read the rest