Laurel and Associates, Ltd. – Madison, WI

Laurel Learning Tips

Tip #773: Set the learner up for success.

On May 20, 2019, Posted by , In trainers, By ,,, , With Comments Off on Tip #773: Set the learner up for success.

“I never teach my pupils, I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.” Albert Einstein

As mentioned in Tip #772, there are only two immutable rules for a trainer. The first is to treat the learner with respect. The second is to set the learner up for success.

A trainer can do this by:  building on what the learner already knows; disconnecting any negative transfer; using training methods that meet the needs of different learning preferences; providing sufficient examples and practice so that the learners can experience and demonstrate their mastery of the new skill; and offering specific and constructive feedback.

The trainer can also set the learner up for success by creating and following a … Read the rest

Tip #772: Treat the learner with respect

On May 13, 2019, Posted by , In trainers, With Comments Off on Tip #772: Treat the learner with respect

“The best way to respect learners: Use techniques that research has proven to work. Help people reach their goals without wasting their time.” Cathy Moore

There are only two immutable rules for a trainer. The first is to treat the learner with respect. This includes recognizing and respecting the learner’s previous experience, current expertise, and pressing interests and needs. The trainer can discover these through formal training needs assessments, informal e-mail queries, or introductory questions at the beginning of a session.  The workshop should be tailored to meet the learners’ needs. This also includes respecting the learner’s time by ensuring that there is good, relevant content and appropriate training methods that build or strengthen necessary skills; and using training methods

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Tip #771:  Create a sense of inclusion for all participants

On May 6, 2019, Posted by , In curriculum design, By , With Comments Off on Tip #771:  Create a sense of inclusion for all participants

“Asking questions is the first way to begin change.” Kubra Salt

Begin training by asking “common ground” questions that help the participants feel that they have something in common in relation to the training topic. A “common ground” question begins with: “How many of you…?” The participants who relate to the question should respond by raising their hands. Make sure that you ask enough questions to ensure that every participant feels included.  For example,  at the beginning of a conflict management class, if you ask: “How many of you have experienced conflict in your life?”, it is a good possibility that everyone will raise their hands.  However, if you ask: “How many of you enjoy conflict?”, you probably need to … Read the rest

Tip #770:  Do not waste time teaching learners what they already know

On April 29, 2019, Posted by , In curriculum design, With Comments Off on Tip #770:  Do not waste time teaching learners what they already know

“If time be of all things the most precious, wasting time must be the greatest prodigality.” Benjamin Franklin

For the next series of Tips, we’re going to go back to basics.

For example:

If you have six hours to accomplish six learning objectives, do not allocate one hour for each objective. We never have all the time we want for a training program, so you don’t want to waste time teaching something that people already know.

Instead, think about what the learners may already know, and then check for their level of learning, using an interactive exercise, such as a discussion question, a questionnaire, or a case study.

Working in small groups, the participants will have an opportunity to … Read the rest

Tip #769: Trial and Error

On April 22, 2019, Posted by , In learning, By , With Comments Off on Tip #769: Trial and Error

“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.” Albert Einstein

No one ever does something perfectly the first time they try something new. But when we talk about behavioral change, we don’t mention that trial and error are a natural part of the process and that repetition until they get it right is important and necessary to build a new skill.

We say that “practice makes perfect” or perfect practice makes perfect, but we don’t acknowledge that practice means repetitive attempts that will frequently involve missteps on the path to success.

It may seem obvious, but caught in the stress of change it is unlikely that employees recognize and calmly accept that repeated failure and … Read the rest

Tip #766: Why We Need WhiteSpace

On April 20, 2019, Posted by , In learning, By , With Comments Off on Tip #766: Why We Need WhiteSpace

Take 5-15 seconds of whitespace before every important meeting, phone call or conversation to focus on the task, situation and people at-hand.” Juliet Funt

Juliet Funt is the CEO of WhiteSpace at Work. She gave a keynote address at the 2019 Training Conference promoting whitespace, which she defines as “the strategic pause taken between activities.”

WhiteSpace at Work has found that 95% of people are interrupted over 5 times per hour; 69% of workers feel highly overworked; 86% of employees agree that taking breaks would make them more productive; 61% of workers feel significant stress about the ever-present pressure of work email. And, as a result, 54% of employees are disengaged and have simply checked out.

According … Read the rest